Let’s Go Exploring!

Two years ago I wrote a blog entry using the title above. We were on the brink of shooting ST. NICK (my first feature film) and, in addition to the conventional impetus during the transition from December to January, I was feeling particularly inspired, partly because director David Lowery and I had just finished scouting the ranch location where, “along with prospecting the land for great shots, we made friends with the cows, the buffalo, and the horses – particularly an overzealous glass-eyed horse with a propensity for biting.” My response to our visit to the ranch had little to do with movie making and more to do with childlike experiences. A renewed spirit had overcome me and this playful mentality seemed to course through the veins of everyone involved with ST. NICK from start to finish. Now, as we enter the second decade of the 21st century, that stimulating sentiment has returned, and I’ll set my sights toward newer projects on the horizon.

The year is looking promising already. In late January, I’ll find myself surrounded by snow in Park City, Utah, at the Sundance Film Festival. Founded, in part, by Robert Redford, Sundance has long been the most prestigious independent film festival in the country. When I was in high school, making short films in lieu of doing homework, I dreamed of one day premiering a film at Sundance. This year I’ve got two films playing there: LOVERS OF HATE (written and directed by Independent Spirit nominee Bryan Poyser) will be making its world premiere in the U.S. Dramatic Competition section and Clay Liford’s short, MY MOM SMOKES WEED, will be screening in a shorts block program.

A dark comedy, surrounding two adult brothers in love with the same woman, LOH relies on deep-seated sibling rivalry to present a convincing tale of deceit. Rudy Lucas is a complete and utter failure at everything. Recently separated from but still in love with his wife Diana, Rudy lives in his car, barely holding on to his job as a door-to-door fact collector for the U.S. Census Bureau. He showers at the car wash or at the homes of unsuspecting home dwellers, constantly bugs his soon-to-be ex-wife, and is all-too-obviously jealous of the success of his younger brother Paul. A children’s author of fantasy tales in the spirit of the Harry Potter ilk, Paul dedicates every one of his best selling novels to his older brother – his inspiration for the lead character and childhood co-collaborator. Oddly enough, upon watching the film you’ll get a few second’s glance at me playing the only “grown-up Paul Lucas fan,” as the author reads a selection from his latest novel. An opportunity arises and Diana decides to visit Paul at a mammoth ski lodge, incidentally located in Park City, while he’s writing a new book. Soon after, Rudy takes a road trip of his own, and, as the intimate moments between Paul and Diana play out, the unexpected visitor silently follows their every move, as he hides in closets and peeks around staircases. Upon discovering the sneaky housemate, tension rises and unexpected events unfold in a climatic, despairing finale.

MMSW premiered at the 2008 Sidewalk Moving Picture Festival. The film garnered the attention of critics and film programmers as it made its way on the festival circuit via some of the smaller, hip festivals. Sundance caught wind of this and invited the film to screen in 2010. While obviously the film centers around Marijuana, the story is thematically concerned with the unsettling relationship of a mildly resentful, uptight son and his loose, septuagenarian mother. Tension mounts from the very beginning as a disappointed son enters his mother’s smoke-filled room. Although happy to see him, his aging mother has difficulty rising up to hug her visiting son. As if it were a chore, he uneasily helps her up. The mood sets in and the audience is bombarded with awkwardly, uncomfortable situations throughout the film. Apparently, mom has set up a drug deal and her son is to provide transportation. Overly against the whole deal, he reluctantly agrees to drive, though mother and son argue about how to get there the entire way. Upon arrival at the drug dealers’ apartment, the son is filled with anxiety as the pot heads sample the product, and steps outside for some air. Paranoid and distraught, his only recourse is to spill the beans about he and his mother’s relationship, while one of the druggies listens. A moment of satisfaction turns completely topsy turvy as the situation culminates with consternation and the son finds himself in a most compromising predicament.

In addition to screening these two films, I intend to announce several other projects at Sundance, to be shot in 2010. I also have two other films set to premiere at later festivals and one other film currently on the circuit; although, dear readers, you’ll have to wait for another column or check my blog for news. The title “Let’s Go Exploring!” comes from Calvin’s final words to his stuffed tiger, Hobbes, as they embark on their final documented journey in Bill Watterson’s final Calvin and Hobbes strip, published December 31, 1995. The inseparable duo enter the strip, sled in hand, after a hard snow the night before. Hobbes remarks, “Everything familiar has disappeared! The world looks brand-new!” to which Calvin responds, “A new year… A fresh, clean start!” making it quite clear that despite the retiring of the comic strip, the journey will continue off the newspaper pages. As I type this, the year hasn’t quite ended and amidst feelings of complete satisfaction at where this year has taken me, I’ve got a childlike anxiety about entering the new year. It certainly is a fresh, clean start; and I’m ready to explore.

Learn more about Adam and his films at http://www.adamdonaghey.com

*** Article originally published in The SCENE Magazine – January 2010 ***



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